In July of 2016, Dylan Scott released "My Girl" as a single, shortly after marrying his inspiration for the tune, his longtime love Blair. The two have been together since sophomore year of high school, including a period of long-distance dating when Scott moved to Nashville and his now-wife stayed in their home state of Louisiana. It was on one of his trips home that Scott got the inspiration for "My Girl;" below, he tells the story behind the song to The Boot.

This one particular time, we were just riding around listening to the radio, and she started flipping around my radio stations; she stopped when she got to an artist by the name of Eminem. She’s really shy, but for some reason, she started dancing -- she was over on my side of the truck -- and she started rapping to this Eminem song. It really threw me off when she started rapping; I thought she knew a couple lyrics of it, and she basically just sat there and rapped the entire song. It was hot is what it was: Here I am, 20 years old, and my girlfriend is rapping Eminem and doing a really good job at it. I thought, "Wow."

I got back [to Nashville] and decided with a buddy of mine, this is what happened last week, and I want to write a song about it. It was tough to put Eminem references in a country song, and so we finally got it in there, but I stopped him, and I said, "Let’s just call this song “My Girl,” and I’ll write it about all the things I get to see in my girl that nobody else gets to see." She’s not gonna sit there and rap Eminem in front of anybody!

As I was writing it, I wanted to put [in] true stuff, stuff that we have experienced together, stuff that reminds me of her. Also, I feel like other guys, when they hear this, they’ll think, “That’s my girl. That’s the stuff my girl does when it’s just us." It’s just stuff that we experienced together from the time we were 15, 16 years old, up until the time we wrote the song. All that stuff in the song is true about her ... The only line in this song that isn’t true is the Crown and Sprite reference; she doesn’t really drink, but it rhymed really good, [and you've] gotta have a little drinking in a country song, so we put that in there. Other than that, it’s dead-on to what we’ve experienced together.

I waited until it was over with; I didn’t tell her about it. Not that I was going to surprise her with it, but I was one of those deals where ... a lot of the times, when I write a song, it’s never going to see the light of day; I’m really picky about what I write. I’m not the type of writer who thinks that I wrote the best song today; it takes me a while to realize that I’ve got something. Once I wrote it, I hoped it was good, but I was second-thinking it. I listened to it a couple times in the studio, and I thought, "Man, we’ve got something here.”

She’s usually the first person I go to with any song, whether it’s about her, or anything I record. She’s really honest; she’ll tell me straight up if she doesn't like something or if she loves it. She’s usually pretty good: The things she loves usually make the album. I heard this, and I had to play it for her, and obviously she knew it was about her. It was pretty cool seeing her reaction to it.

Country's Greatest Love Stories